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appalling to hear a dialogue that talks about using religion to discriminate against both myself and my community. you know, when i was in high sdoo school, i was actually assaulted because i was gay. as a result, i spent most of my life down playing the fact. you know, i don't ride in pride parades and i don't really wear it on my cuff, but i really feel compelled to really put it out there. you know, i don't think that we deserve a bill like this anywhere in this country. >> joining me now, damian klinko, the arizona state representative you just heard from and washington post columnist jonathan capehart. what made you speak about the bill the way you did, using your own personal reference, which as you said is not something that you are inclined to do. >> i used my own story because this is a personal attack against me and everyone in the lgbt community in the state of arizona. the community doesn't deserve this sort of treatment. and i don't think there's ever an excuse that we should sanction discrimination against a minority group. it makes me sad and disappointed in a state that
for businesses to discriminate against lbgt people. it was pushed by people who fear that the freedom of religion is under attack. but she pushed back saying there were no instances in arizona of religious freedom taking a backseat to lbgt right. >> senate bill 1062 does not address a specific concern related to religious liberty in arizona. i have not heard of one example in arizona where business owners' religious liberty has been violated. >> the thing is, arizona is not an outlier here anymore. at least 12 other states are looking at similar bills. oregon could even see something on its ballot this year. several of these efforts have run into roadblocks, sure, or even political abandonment following the outcry in arizona. but it is, we think, all part of a larger strategy on the right, invoking religion as a trump card in venues where there was actually a consensus that other, shall we say, nonreligious values rule. i'm thinking about like profits in the corporate board room or science in the public hospital. and where arizona's effort failed spectacularly, a more careful interpretation and v
businesses to use religion as an excuse to legally refuse service to anybody. gosh, now that's a pretty broad-brush, you know. no matter what brewer decides, it hasn't been fast enough. at the center of the storm is this person right here. you know what, there's just a damn good political operative in every state in america, isn't there? here's a good one for the conservatives, here name is kathy her rod. she's the president of the center for arizona policy. she's the architect of 1062. kathy herrod is not an elected official but wields power. she may be more powerful than the governor herself in arizona. >> in 2011, we reached a pinnacle for us that the arizona legislature over the last 15 years has passed 101 bills supported by center for arizona policy. those bills run the gamut of life, marriage and family and re religious liberty, we're blessed we've reached 100 bills and looking forward to the next 100. >> they're very blessed. there are hundreds of people like kathy herrod who work in the background to get this going, crafting legislation and then they push their own agendas. where are
to see again that religion was used to veil discrimination. it was just really a disappointing piece of legislation that it even came forward at all, and that in 2014 we're evening discussing this time of policy. i saw you on lawrence o'donnell's show last night, and you said you normally don't make public reference to your sexuality, but you had to take a strong stand, given what was happens in your home state. >> you know, i think sometimes you have to stand up and speak for what's right. when a bill like this moves through the political process, you know, whether it was discriminating against the lbgt community or another minority group, it's important to stand up and speak for what's right and speak from the heart. if my story helped illuminate that or provided insight to the other members of the house of representatives, to the type of impact it would have on individuals, then i hope that it helped. >> it's interesting, many decisions we have seen in our country have been made through the motivations of money, whether you person was afraid they would lose money or could stand to
will the debates over freedom and religion and gay rights play into the 2014 campaign? and why rand paul is urging caution in the gop's fight with president obama. >> there are times when people are using language that shouldn't be used. i recently criticized someone for using some of that language. i'm not going to bring it up, but i will say that we can disagree with the president without calling him names. >> "meet the press" is brought to you by boeing, where the drive to build something better inspires us every day. [ female announcer ] who are we? we are the thinkers. the job jugglers. the up all-nighters. and the ones who turn ideas into action. we've made our passions our life's work. we strive for the moments where we can say, "i did it!" ♪ we are entrepreneurs who started it all... with a signature. legalzoom has helped start over 1 million businesses, turning dreamers into business owners. and we're here to help start yours. this is mike. his long race day starts with back pain... ...and a choice. take 4 advil in a day which is 2 aleve... ...for all day relief. "start your engines" >>
with politics. how will the debates over freedom and religion and gay rights play into the 2014 campaign? andian rand paul is urging caution in the gop's fight with president obama. >> there are times when people are using language that shouldn't be used. i recently criticized someone for using some of that lock. i'm not going to bring it up, but i will say that we can disagree with the president without calling him names. >> "meet the press" is brought to you by boeing, where the >> "meet the press" is brought to you by bo[ julie ]re the the wrinkle cream graveyard. if it doesn't work fast... you're on to the next thing. neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair has the fastest retinol formula to visibly reduce fine lines and wrinkles in just one week. neutrogena®. to visibly reduce fine lines and wrinkles in just one week. so our business can be on at&t's network for $175 a month? yup. all 5 of you for $175. our clients need a lot of attention. there's unlimited talk and text. we're working deals all day. you get 10 gigabytes of data to share. what about expansion potential? add a line, anytime, for
against gays on the basis of religion. but iowa congressman steve king is still defending that law. why? king says that sex orientation is what he calls self-professed behavior. and therefore he says business owners might not know just who they can or cannot discriminate against. >> it's clear in the civil rights section of the code that you can't discriminate against people based upon -- i'm not sure i got the list right, but race, creed, religion, color of skin, those kind of things. and there is nothing mentioned in there on self-professed behavior. the one thing i reference when i say self-professed is how do you know who to discriminate against? they have to tell you. and are they then setting up a case? is this about bringing a grievance or is it actually about a service they would like to have. >> so what mr. king is saying there is that customers could claim to be gay just to entrap business owners into discriminating against them so they could then seek legal reparations. here is a further question. is religion not by his wording also self-professed? >>> finally, "12 years a sl
in georgia yes two bills with religion our liberty in their titles and were seen as a way to possibly discriminate against gay men and lesbian, go down in that. also in another conservative state. we are seeing a tidal wave on this issue that i think will be hard for people to resist in just about any corner of it. >> yeah, you put it that way. that's extraordinary, coming from how long you've been covering these state and national issues. jackie, when you look at the legal issues here which as we've said we're -- which combined with the political legislature, and then something else, jackie, which is the fact that these issues are being covered differently, i think, and not covered always on the sometimes conservative terms of calling it religious liberty. a lot of people support religious liberty, but they don't think that means it should be a cover for discrimination. >> well, yeah, i think one of the things that's been interesting, particularly with the republican party is the strain of libertarianism that's been infused recently, which is another reason why i think you see some r
burden a person's exercise of religion even if the burden results from a rule of general applicability, a rule applied to everybody. now what the law does, what the law would do, this law that the governor is looking at, is make a couple of amendments. first of all, it would not apply just to a person but to a business as well. so a business could assert a religious freedom interest. and basically what it would do is give businesses who refuse to serve someone for religious reasons a defense if they get sued. so that's how the law would change the current religious freedom restoration act. it would apply to businesses. they could go to court if they're sued and say, you know, it was our religious -- this is our religious freedom. it would violate it to serve someone if we believe that would interfere with our practices and beliefs. >> so, pete, there are people who are making the argument against the law saying, well, listen, maybe a muslim business owner will say, i don't want to serve christians or maybe the law could be used in some other way. somebody who had an objection, let's sa
. >>> arizona governor jan brewer was forced to veto legislation that would use religion to codify hate and deny basic rights. major corporations like american airlines, at&t, the nfl and mlb, in addition to business leaders throughout the state urged the governor to veto the bill. while similar measures have been introduced in about a dozen other republican-controlled states like kansas, south dakota and tennessee, by the end of the week, the moral and economic arguments seem to have had an impact. now this comes as we've seen a rapidly growing acceptance of lbgt americans and issues like same-sex marriage. a federal judge ordered kentucky to immediately begin recognizing same-sex marriages from other states. so that suggests to me that the reason for the proliferation of these hateful measures is fear. just like the anti-women's rights and anti-voting rights legislation we've seen in states, these measures represent fear of a changed reality. but the question now is whether or not the events of last week represent a final tipping point in ensuring equal rights for lbgt americans. let's bring i
under state law in arizona. race, gender and religion are but being gay is not. it wasn't protected before brewer vetoed the bill and it still isn't protected after the veto. the waiting photographer refused to fake pick kpurs of the gay couple and she was sued for it. the bill she vetoed was an effort to protect against the legal challenges that could result from discrimination. even with this bill gone there is no law on arizona's books that prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation. at least 12 states this year has issued legislation like arizona to extend the tide. senator mike lee of utah, conservative republican has introduced the marriage and religious freedom act. as they scramble topaz these laws, though, the courts seem to be moving in the opposite direction, even when it comes to red state america. just this week a federal judge ordered officials in the state of kentucky to start recognizing the marriage of same-sex couples that were performed outside of the state. and in texas, federal judge struck down that state's ban on same-sex marriage ruling that the cur
religion has the most force. the courts are like the worst place in order to try to get a religious belief codified or encoded into law. because the way in which the supreme court. >> you have to have a secular purpose for the law. when religious right was on the offense, what it did was to use a ballot initiative. everyone goes into the voting booth and votes their religious convictions. you can't second guess that. now that those statutes have become to be struck down by the courts, giving us secular reasons. now that they're playing defense, what the religious right is doing is saying, let's rely on the free exercise clause in order to allow individuals to sort these claims in court. in some ways, arizona was the easiest case, she showed no evidence of religious discrimination against businesses. land of legal, gay rights organization told me today they had received almost 500 complaints over the past four years about lgbt discrimination in arizona. >> which is legal. >> it starts to feel like, you hurt my fist when i hit your face argument. but i think as we move to other states, that
's all right, it's okay to start dating. >> what religion is that? >> we're christian denomination called cedar hills tabernacle. >> i've been by there. >> really? you are welcome anytime to go visit. >> looks good. >> yeah. >> it seems tom was right not to discuss his family situation with the barber. where do you want to go? >> i'm not so for or against homosexuality. the way i believe, god is nod mat at the people, but he's mad at the fact there is homosexuality. >> so you think it's not a good thing? >> i don't think it's a good thing at all. it's horrible to see especially in the public or around young kids. it's a bad influence on them. >> what would you say if i said that the man's hair you just cut is a gay parent and that kid has two gay dads? >> i'm willing to work with them, whatever, as long as no crazy thing goes on. >> the other thing is they're transgenders, they used to be women. >> really? i would have never guessed that part. that's crazy. i don't know what to say to that part. no, i mean, hey, that's his business. it's not the way it's supposed to be, of course, but can
of their religion, that's already covered under current law. the only group not covered under current or federal state law in arizona for nondiscrimination is gays and lesbians. everybody else is already covered. >> that's a separate issue, of course. just to go back to what you were saying, if you actually read the language of the law, it was a terribly drawn law. it was full of language like if there's a compelling state interest, then you can compel someone to even violate what he calls his religious conscience. the point is i think reasonable people can agree and we should find the areas of agreement, not disagreement. for instance, i do think we should agree that people should not be forced by government to do something that seriously violates conscience if it is based on a legitimate religious recognized in your church. however, that doesn't give you the right to ban access to what was called public accommodations. that was the basis for the greatest legislation in this area, the civil rights act of 1964. i think we ought to go back to that and specify public accommodations. >> but again f
a hotly debated religion bill, business leaders across the state are calling on governor jan brewer to veto the proposed law or risk damaging the state's image and its economic recovery. >> opponents now include the arizona chamber of commerce, the arizona super bowl host committee, apple which has major interests in this state, and both americans airlines and mare rot. now, as local and national businesses are making their voices heard, politicians both in and outside of arizona are pushing to distance themselves from the law. three senators from arizona who voted for the bill are now, actually, get this, are urging the governor to veto it. and state senator steve pierce told chris hayes last night, it was some sort of crazy mixup. >> i believe it was going to be slowed down, wasn't going to come to the floor as soon as it did. i can tell you there's a number of us that we were terxting eac other madly, do we go with it, do we not? so we made a mistake. that's about all i can tell you is we went the wrong way. >> yes. they went the wrong way. and it's too late to reverse that becau
the case in arizona, businesses to use religion as a defense in a private lawsuit. so to give you an example of how that might play out, you know, let's say you live in a state where it's illegal to fire someone because they're gay. now, if one of these bills passes, that company could turn around and say, oh, hey, i think homosexuality is a sin, therefore i'm going to fire you and i don't need to abide by this law. so, you know, that lawsuit provision is a big deal. >> i know in some of the cases, in some of the states where they've been considering this, the lawsuit provision works in such a way not only can you not sue somebody for discriminating against you, but if you do, you have to pay their legal fees as well as your own so it's almost a punishment for even complaining about being discriminated against. it's fascinating stuff and fast-moves story. dana lieblson, reporter for "mother jones." nice to see you. >> thanks for having any. >>> the federal prosecutor's investigation of the george washington bridge scandal in chris christie's new jersey has taken a turn today. we'v
provides that, quote, government shall not substantially burden a person's exercise of religion explicitly expanding that protection to allow businesses to cite a violation of their own religious beliefs as a defense if they're sued for failing to provide service. the bill was inspired by a new mexico supreme court ruling against a wedding photographer who refused service to a same-sex couple, and it massed quickly through the very conservative-controlled state legislature in arizona last week. in the last few days, pressure on brewer to veto the bill has grown from almost every corner. the arizona story crossed the threshold from political feeding frenzy into the mainstream. it was showing up on every platform yesterday, from espn to late-night talk shows. and though brewer claimed she was not influenced by cheers and boos from the crowd, it was clear from the outset that her state, whose reputation has already been tarnished over the years in the wake of the state's 2010 immigration law, had a lot to lose. on wednesday, the nfl, quote, began investigating the necessary steps to move next
religion, also under consideration at this point. joining me here onset to make sense of all of this is one of the big voices from the last few years of lgbt advocacy, roberta caplin argued edie windsor's case before the supreme court. i can only imagine how stressful it was. you had an entire movement riding on your shoulders. thank you for joining us and trying to make sense of the latest events. we see yesterday's news out of texas, similar rulings before that in virginia and kentucky. what do you think the future holds for those cases? what do you think the next thing to hit the supreme court might be? >> the windsor case came down at the end of june. since that decision there have been 15 court decisions in courts throughout the country in places like as you mentioned, kentucky, virginia, utah, oklahoma, all relying on windsor. i don't think that's surprising at all. windsor is about the core dignity of gay people and how they have the same type of dignity and should get the same respect as everyone else. once the supreme court has said that as i predicted back in the summer, it's all
, and they agree on this. that is sort of the old school, old time religion message. whatever societal problems you think are holding you back, it's not an excuse for you to is a advance. it really irritates a lot of young black men who say you're blaming the victim and you're saying you're putting all the burden on them to ignore all of these social ills that are real and not dealing with the social ills themselves. it's something that the president's critics don't like. but the interesting thing about president obama is that he knows that. he is actively engaging those critics. and he is pushing back. and he really wants them to agree with him that this is the right message to send to young black men. and you get the sense that this is a president who doesn't want to leave office not having given this message to young men, not having been a physical, living example of what he wants them to aspire to. he is a this aspirational politics is his core. that's his kansas grandmother talking to him. his upbringing with by his grandparents is what you hear. and he really does believe it. >> let's listen
, what they want to do. either as an individual or a nation. the monotheistic religions of the world all push its members to fight against poverty. but right now the united states of america, the rich are getting richer, and the poor are getting what the rich don't take with them. >> congressman emanuel cleaver and sister simone campbell, i'm going to have to leave it there. thank you both for your time tonight. >> thank you, reverend. >> good to be here. >>> still ahead, a top democrat calls out republicans for their dependence on billionaire koch brothers. >>> but first, new surveillance video of a deadly shooting inside a walmart. one man is dead and the shooter has not been arrested. we'll talk about it next. covert ops? double agents? spy thriller? you don't know "aarp" thanks to the aarp tek program, this guy is spying on his new grandson. aarp tek gets people better connected to technology, to better connect with each other. with social media, digital devices and apps. if you don't think "hashtag love dad" when you think aarp, then you don't know "aarp" find more surprising possib
. we all know religion was cited repeatedly in a different context for racial segregation, then people moved on and a lot of religious believers today do not look at their teachings any more as a justification for that. >> well, that's because that was perversion of scripture. look, scripture doesn't change. the guide is the same yesterday, today, forever, the evangelical will tell you and because they believe that way, to use scripture in a way to prof ul gait segregation is wrong and a misuse of scripture. that's a separate altogether, ari. >> i don't want to go too deeply theological, and you might just win that debate, if it comes to certain parts of the book i don't know as well, but what i also want to get in is the politics on 2016. margie, are there going to be republicans that decide when they are running, they need to be the first mainstream republican presidential candidate to be open to marriage equality? margie first. >> i think there are some republicans who might be a candidate for doing that. i don't know if that's a winning strategy in some of these early primary state
't okay. and she called him on it. >> do you have any idea, like, what religion i practice, what my political views are, what my views on social issues, things that matter? do you have any idea how i want to raise my kids? do you have any idea about any of that? >> i have no idea about any of that. >> and with that, she walked right off the show. but you haven't seen the last of her. she's reportedly set to be the next bachelorette. so for knowing her own worth and for showing women that in juan pablo's infamous words, it's okay, to stand up for ourselves, she's our disrupter of the week. >>> and coming up, a new trove of documents reveal the inner workings of the clinton administration and a new book details secretary of state hillary clinton's leadership style. so what more can we learn about hillary? that is coming up. starts with back pain... ...and a choice. take 4 advil in a day which is 2 aleve... ...for all day relief. "start your engines" new business owner, it would be one thing i've learned is my philosophy is real simple american express open forum is an on-line communit
emphasize tolerance and inclusiveness and prohibit discrimination based on age, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation. governor brewer has until saturday to veto the bill. hough, just a few hours ago she tweeted "i assure you, as always, i will do the right thing for the state of arizona." i throw it to you, joe. >> first of all, this was such a needle lesless battle that repus of arizona put on the front pages of papers nationwide. i say needless ba lesless becaut hard to believe that the supreme court would ever allow a law to be upheld that would let somebody that own as restaurant deny service to somebody because of their sexual orientation. for those who say, well, somebody should be able to do that based on their devout religious beliefs, do you then give -- because if you're going to allow somebody to not serve a customer based on their sexual orientation because they see that as a sin, that then allows other restaurant owners in arizona to decide they're not going to serve someone who himself been divorced, like myself, or someone who has committed adultery, or if you want
religion if they didn't want to -- in particular if they didn't want to serve a customer. but the laws were not so specific as to say, well, you don't have to serve a gay person. they were just stating that you could cite religion as a reason not to do so in a court proceeding. now, whether or not they're a backlash to same-sex marriage, it's obvious the changes were proposed for that reason because that's what the legislators said that they were concerned about. i don't think it's going to do anything to stem the tide of support for same-sex marriage or for gay rights generally. >> adam, thank you. >>> up next, the "brain trust," spike lee, this is msnbc. suddee a mouthbreather. well, put on a breathe right strip and instantly open your nose up to 38% more than cold medicines alone. so you can breathe and sleep. shut your mouth and sleep right. breathe right. so you can breathe and sleep. "stubborn love" by the lumineers did you i did. email? so what did you think of the house? did you see the school ratings? oh, you're right. hey babe, i got to go. bye daddy! have a good day at school, ok
a controversial bill that divided the state. supporters touted the legislation as protecting religion freedom for businesses but critics said sb 1060 denying legal service to same-sex couples. the governor's decision follows intense pressure, including thousands of petitions from human rights activists and press releases from some of the nation's largest corporation. among them is american airlines and daeelta and apple. >> instead, this is the first policy bill to cross my desk. senate bill 1062 does not address a specific or present concern related to religious liberty in arizona. i've not heard one example in arizona where business owners religious liberty has been violated. the bill is broadly worded and could result in negative consequences. after weighing all of the argument i have vetoed senate bill 1062 moments ago. >> john mccain and jeff plak who are republican senators publicly lobbied for the governor's veto and hailed the decision they made. >> mark, call it like she is. governor brewer was looking at business. she heard from the commissioner of the nfl they may take the super bo
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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